What Is the Best Font for My Website?

Posted on January 20, 2021 | Updated on February 1, 2021

Figuring out which font for a website can be stressful. You want something reflecting your personality as a brand but also readable on both desktop and mobile devices. You may already have a logo and want something that meshes well with other design elements. 

According to Internet Live Stats, there are about 200,000 active websites, although the number changes frequently. You’re competing with social media and other sites for attention. If you want to stand out, you must pay attention to your design’s every little detail, including your font hierarchy. 

Figuring out what is the best font for a website starts with understanding the fonts available. There are four basic types of fonts.

Serif

Serif fonts have the little accents on the tails and stems of letters. Serifs can be a simple line or a curved end. They have a classical look, giving them a formal edge. Examples of best serif fonts for a website include:

  • Garamond 
  • Caslon 
  • Ogg 
  • Plantin
  • Romana

These are just a handful of some of the fonts with a serif design. Make sure whatever font you choose works in different browsers. Some designers choose a Google font because they work in the popular Chrome platform and are free for personal and commercial use.

Sans Serif

If you want a font with a modern edge, sans serif lacks the extra flourishes of a serif typeface. This choice works well for headings and logos. Although some use it for body text, be cautious as it can become difficult to read on smaller screens. Examples of popular sans serif fonts include:

  • Open Sans 
  • Istok Web 
  • Montserrat 
  • Proxima Nova 
  • Lota 
  • Avenir

When seeking out sans serif for body text, look for a style that isn’t too thin. If there are thinner points in the stems, they can almost disappear as you scale the type down to a smaller size. 

Script

If you want a handwritten look, script fonts are an excellent choice. They give a formal event type look with cursive letters, swirls and connected pieces. Some scripts have more flourishes than others. Some popular script fonts used on websites are:

  • Alex Brush 
  • Windsong
  • Lobster 
  • Yellowtail 
  • Dancing Script

Scripts work best for headings and logos. They become unreadable in smaller sizes, especially on mobile devices, so stick with a serif or sans serif for body text. 

Decorative

If you want to give your site a truly unique look, turn to decorative fonts. While there are many options available for download, you could also have someone create or refine a font with specific elements matching your business’ personality. Here are a few decorative fonts you might enjoy:

  • Henny Penny
  • Cinzel Decorative
  • Carter Layered
  • Cherie Bomb
  • Runy Tunes

If you search for decorative fonts, you’ll find thousands of choices. Narrow your search as much as possible by adding keywords tied to your industry. With a little effort, you’ll find the best headline font available. 

Combining Types

Most websites turn to more than a single typeface to meet their needs. Even if you stick to a sole type, you’ll use different elements, such as bold or larger and smaller sizes. Mixing more than one type of font works well. As a rule of thumb, stick with no more than two styles, although some designers get away with three and pull it together. Beginners should go with two.

A serif and sans serif combination tells users you are a company with history and traditions, but you also understand modern technology and consumer needs. One common use is a sans serif heading and serif-based body text. You can alternately flip the two and use the sans serif for content. 

Script and decorative fonts should be reserved for logos and headlines. Using them in body text makes the information difficult to read and may frustrate your users. When using script or decorative, stick with one or the other. Try not to combine the two together unless they truly look outstanding, and the ligatures, tales, flourishes, weights and other elements match symmetrically. 

Studying Sites You Love

Perhaps there are a few sites you enjoy, and you’d love to utilize elements of their style. One technique is to right-click on the page and inspect the design components. You can search for “font” and figure out what they are using for the headings and paragraphs. Once you know the fonts used, you can either use those same ones or search for similar choices.

Figure out which fonts pair best together, and you can make minor adjustments or find choices highly similar to the ones you’ve chosen. 

Pay attention to the logos on those sites as well. Do they use a decorative or script font in their design? Perhaps the look is hand-drawn, and you can’t find it anywhere else. The inability to locate the look is the signal of a custom font. You may not be in a position to afford to hire someone to create a custom option for you, but you might be able to find a ready-made font with a similar look.

Add Flourishes

Another idea for beautiful website typography is using a single font but putting flourishes on your headings or logos. You simply use the same font but add a swash in your image editor to give it a more customized look. You can use something like Photoshop or Canva.com to add some interest to your design. 

Which Font Is Most Pleasing to the Eye?

There is a reason fonts such as Roboto and Helvetica are so popular and used repeatedly throughout the web. They have an excellent balance and are easy to read. People gravitate to them. They can blend with the background and not distract, but also create an aesthetically pleasing look. 

When in doubt, go with the popular choice as it is tried and true. You can always play around with logos and headings until you find just the right mix between traditional and unique. Your site visitors may not be aware of the thought you’ve put into choosing just the right typography, but they’ll appreciate it on a subconscious level.

Figuring out which font for a website can be stressful. You want something reflecting your personality as a brand but also readable on both desktop and mobile devices. You may already have a logo and want something that meshes well with other design elements. 

According to Internet Live Stats, there are about 200,000 active websites, although the number changes frequently. You’re competing with social media and other sites for attention. If you want to stand out, you must pay attention to your design’s every little detail, including your font hierarchy. 

Figuring out what is the best font for a website starts with understanding the fonts available. There are four basic types of fonts.

Serif

Serif fonts have the little accents on the tails and stems of letters. Serifs can be a simple line or a curved end. They have a classical look, giving them a formal edge. Examples of best serif fonts for a website include:

  • Garamond 
  • Caslon 
  • Ogg 
  • Plantin
  • Romana

These are just a handful of some of the fonts with a serif design. Make sure whatever font you choose works in different browsers. Some designers choose a Google font because they work in the popular Chrome platform and are free for personal and commercial use.

Sans Serif

If you want a font with a modern edge, sans serif lacks the extra flourishes of a serif typeface. This choice works well for headings and logos. Although some use it for body text, be cautious as it can become difficult to read on smaller screens. Examples of popular sans serif fonts include:

  • Open Sans 
  • Istok Web 
  • Montserrat 
  • Proxima Nova 
  • Lota 
  • Avenir

When seeking out sans serif for body text, look for a style that isn’t too thin. If there are thinner points in the stems, they can almost disappear as you scale the type down to a smaller size. 

Script

If you want a handwritten look, script fonts are an excellent choice. They give a formal event type look with cursive letters, swirls and connected pieces. Some scripts have more flourishes than others. Some popular script fonts used on websites are:

  • Alex Brush 
  • Windsong
  • Lobster 
  • Yellowtail 
  • Dancing Script

Scripts work best for headings and logos. They become unreadable in smaller sizes, especially on mobile devices, so stick with a serif or sans serif for body text. 

Decorative

If you want to give your site a truly unique look, turn to decorative fonts. While there are many options available for download, you could also have someone create or refine a font with specific elements matching your business’ personality. Here are a few decorative fonts you might enjoy:

  • Henny Penny
  • Cinzel Decorative
  • Carter Layered
  • Cherie Bomb
  • Runy Tunes

If you search for decorative fonts, you’ll find thousands of choices. Narrow your search as much as possible by adding keywords tied to your industry. With a little effort, you’ll find the best headline font available. 

Combining Types

Most websites turn to more than a single typeface to meet their needs. Even if you stick to a sole type, you’ll use different elements, such as bold or larger and smaller sizes. Mixing more than one type of font works well. As a rule of thumb, stick with no more than two styles, although some designers get away with three and pull it together. Beginners should go with two.

A serif and sans serif combination tells users you are a company with history and traditions, but you also understand modern technology and consumer needs. One common use is a sans serif heading and serif-based body text. You can alternately flip the two and use the sans serif for content. 

Script and decorative fonts should be reserved for logos and headlines. Using them in body text makes the information difficult to read and may frustrate your users. When using script or decorative, stick with one or the other. Try not to combine the two together unless they truly look outstanding, and the ligatures, tales, flourishes, weights and other elements match symmetrically. 

Studying Sites You Love

Perhaps there are a few sites you enjoy, and you’d love to utilize elements of their style. One technique is to right-click on the page and inspect the design components. You can search for “font” and figure out what they are using for the headings and paragraphs. Once you know the fonts used, you can either use those same ones or search for similar choices.

Figure out which fonts pair best together, and you can make minor adjustments or find choices highly similar to the ones you’ve chosen. 

Pay attention to the logos on those sites as well. Do they use a decorative or script font in their design? Perhaps the look is hand-drawn, and you can’t find it anywhere else. The inability to locate the look is the signal of a custom font. You may not be in a position to afford to hire someone to create a custom option for you, but you might be able to find a ready-made font with a similar look.

Add Flourishes

Another idea for beautiful website typography is using a single font but putting flourishes on your headings or logos. You simply use the same font but add a swash in your image editor to give it a more customized look. You can use something like Photoshop or Canva.com to add some interest to your design. 

Which Font Is Most Pleasing to the Eye?

There is a reason fonts such as Roboto and Helvetica are so popular and used repeatedly throughout the web. They have an excellent balance and are easy to read. People gravitate to them. They can blend with the background and not distract, but also create an aesthetically pleasing look. 

When in doubt, go with the popular choice as it is tried and true. You can always play around with logos and headings until you find just the right mix between traditional and unique. Your site visitors may not be aware of the thought you’ve put into choosing just the right typography, but they’ll appreciate it on a subconscious level.

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