What Is the Best CSS Framework?

Posted on October 31, 2022 | Updated on July 14, 2023

As you know, the internet is full of new and constant changes. Therefore, CSS frameworks are shifting as well. So you may be asking yourself, what is the best CSS framework?

A CSS framework should make your front-end development increasingly productive and easily more enjoyable. Plus, you’ll want to find one that’ll help you produce good layouts fast. 

In this article, you’ll find the best frameworks on the market to find the one that fits your needs.

1. Tailwind CSS

Tailwind is a lightweight framework that provides more freedom for web developers. You might like Tailwind since you can incorporate your unique style. It doesn’t come with pre-made templates, so you don’t have to override anything.

Therefore, you can work faster and create your own custom designs. 

It’s also helpful as you can use it on a lower level and take advantage of the building blocks it provides. Yet, the downside is that it requires a steep learning curve. Tailwind requires a full understanding of front-end technologies since it has no pre-made components. 

2. Bootstrap

Bootstrap is one of the most popular CSS frameworks. It has a large community for support, so you can easily discover new solutions to your problems. Plus, you can find free and premium templates to work with within your projects. 

It’s also easily customizable when using SASS variables to help you cut down on your development time. You even have access to open-source projects that the community can choose to work on and maintain. This will give you a good chance to practice your coding to increase your skills. 

However, Bootstrap is challenging to override since it has a specific design. Plus, it can be quite pricey due to all of the features it provides.

3. Materialize CSS

Materialize CSS is a responsive framework based on its material design since it carries collections of minimal pre-made components. It’s also simple for users to learn and provides premium documentation. 

It also has a large community for support and feedback and allows for customized options. Plus, it’s mobile-friendly, allowing you to create web applications with its mobile-like components. 

One drawback is it has a strict design language, which may not be suitable for those looking for something not closely related to material design. 

4. Bulma

Bulma makes a good alternative to Bootstrap since it’s easy to use and features modern code. Many prefer using Bulma since it has a unique aesthetic, creating a boring web page look more appealing. 

Furthermore, Bulma is easy to customize with SASS and you can set defaults in little time. 

Bulma does have a unique style, though. Therefore, you can end up with a similar website design, which you might not look forward to in this framework. Plus, it doesn’t have as many features as Bootstrap, downgrading your accessibility.

5. Foundation

Foundation makes an excellent choice for experienced front-end developers that want the freedom and flexibility of a full-featured framework.

Foundation isn’t only a CSS framework. It also comes fully loaded with development tools you can use together or separately.

Unlike Bootstrap and Bulma, it doesn’t have a distinct style, giving a wide range of components that you can easily customize. 

However, this CSS framework is difficult to manipulate if you don’t understand how to use it. Therefore, it’s a lot more complex than many other frameworks.

What Is the Best CSS Framework for You?

All of the CSS frameworks listed here are great for boosting your productivity. However, Bootstrap, Materialize, and Bulma are less suited for those who don’t have as much experience in front-end development.

Yet, the best CSS framework will depend on your experience level and needs. Consider choosing one to start with and be patient in learning how one works. Various frameworks are available, but you’ll want to choose one that remains relevant to give you time to learn it. 

About The Author

Eleanor Hecks is the Editor-in-Chief of Designerly Magazine, an online publication dedicated to providing in-depth content from the design and marketing industries. When she's not designing or writing code, you can find her re-reading the Harry Potter series, burning calories at a local Zumba class, or hanging out with her dogs, Bear and Lucy.

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